Sprint unleashes 'Pokémon Go' lures at its retail stores to attract players

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Sprint, the fourth largest wireless carrier in the U.S., is capitalizing on the Pokémon Go craze.

Following T-Mobile’s announcement that its U.S. customers will be able to play Pokémon Go for a year without any of the data counting towards their monthly plans, Sprint has laid out its own monster-catching incentives.

Starting on Friday, Sprint will use “lures” (an item in the game that attracts Pokémon to a specific location) at its retail stores and at Boost Mobile shops to entice players to come catch monsters. Retail staff will also provide tips and tricks on how to play the game. And, presumably, make some sales.  Read more…

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'Pokémon Go' on Microsoft HoloLens looks freakin' incredible

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If you’ve played Pokémon Go at all (and at this point, who hasn’t?), you know that one of its most compelling features is its use of augmented reality (AR). That is, when you try to snatch one of those pesky little Pokémon with a Poké Ball, the creature appears superimposed over the real world, captured in real time by your phone’s camera.

It’s pretty cool (and fun!) to see Pokémon running around your neighborhood, the office or even on your daily commute. However, you quickly see the limits of AR tech on smartphones: The virtual characters don’t actually interact with real-life objects, your interactions with them are very limited, and you have to — ugh — actually hold your phone. Read more…

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'Pokémon Go' on Microsoft HoloLens looks freakin' incredible

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f145988%2fpokemon

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If you’ve played Pokémon Go at all (and at this point, who hasn’t?), you know that one of its most compelling features is its use of augmented reality (AR). That is, when you try to snatch one of those pesky little Pokémon with a Poké Ball, the creature appears superimposed over the real world, captured in real time by your phone’s camera.

It’s pretty cool (and fun!) to see Pokémon running around your neighborhood, the office or even on your daily commute. However, you quickly see the limits of AR tech on smartphones: The virtual characters don’t actually interact with real-life objects, your interactions with them are very limited, and you have to — ugh — actually hold your phone. Read more…

More about Microsoft, Microsoft Hololens, Hololens, Pokemon Go, and Pokemon

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Autopilot was not engaged in Model X rollover crash, Tesla says

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Tesla has one fewer crash to worry about now — at least according to Elon Musk.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk tweeted Thursday that the Model X that rolled over on a freeway in Pennsylvania on July 1 did not in fact have Autopilot engaged at the time of the crash. 

What’s more, he asserts that the rollover would not have taken place, if the system were active.

Remember, this is just Musk’s word. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is still investigating the crash. Its findings will be the final word on the rollover. Read more…

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