Here is the inevitable flying selfie stick

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It seems there is no limit to humankind’s selfie obsession. After all, this week brought us the British chap who took what he called a selfie with the person who had just hijacked his plane.

So of course, there must be a flying selfie stick. It was only a matter of time. Built by Australian technology company IoT Group, the ROAM-e, opened for pre-sale Thursday and should begin shipping internationally in June. 

According to Ian Duffell, executive director of the IoT Group, the company’s vision was to build “a selfie stick on steroids.”  Read more…

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Get your first glimpse at a Roborace autonomous racecar

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I’m sorry but, “Robots, start your motors” just doesn’t have the same ring to it.

Never mind. What the all-autonomous Roborace lacks in human personas and engine noise, its cars easily make up for with visual panache.

That’s clearly evidenced by the first design renderings released by Roborace, the world’s first driverless racing series, Wednesday afternoon.

The car was penned computerized by Chief Design Officer Daniel Simon who’s famous for his work on the sci-fi movies Tron: Legacy and Oblivion. If I do say so myself, Simon has outdone himself this time. Read more…

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Oculus Rift teardown reveals many, many chips and a hidden microphone

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Safe to say, people are *excited* about the Oculus Rift, and that includes taking it apart.

It’s a slick-looking device, but there are plenty of intricate bits to check out inside. In this teardown, courtesy of iFixit, you can take a look at the large lenses, the invisible infrared dots that help track head movements, and the very mysterious “hidden” microphone.

If you’re lucky enough to get your hands on a not-very-cheap Oculus Rift headset, we can’t recommend you do this deconstruction at home. Better just satisfy your curiosity with the video. 

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Unboxing Microsoft's HoloLens Development Edition

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Microsoft officially unveiled the augmented reality headset packaging on Tuesday during the opening keynote for its Build 2016 developers conference. I got a special opportunity to unbox one of the early units.

HoloLens Box

HoloLens Box

Image: Andrew Burton/Mashable

Seeing the package for the first time, you finally understand what $3,000 gets you in the world of cutting-edge holographic headgear.

The large, birthday cake-sized box is made of black, heavy cardboard, with an outline graphic of the product. When you open it, you see Microsoft’s trademark blue and a fully cocooned HoloLens Development Edition. That cocoon is actually the gray carrying case, which has a single, thumb-sized loop for portability. Read more…

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HoloLens could get into finance with this VR workstation

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SAN FRANCISCO, California — As HoloLens makes its way from Microsoft’s development labs into the hands of early developer and enterprise customers, the big question remains: What will they do with it?

Microsoft has done its best to guide would-be developers with a series of demonstrations dating back to the official launch in early 2015. Back then, NASA (still a major partner) showed how the self-contained holographic computer could use mixed reality to present Mars Curiosity Rover data and imagery in a whole new way. That demonstration inspired at least one company.

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Dyson's new smart fan will tell you the quality of the air you're breathing

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Dyson is hopping into the regular-product-turned-smart game with its new Pure Cool Link smart air-purifying fanSmart air purifiers aren’t exactly new, but a big name like Dyson jumping on the smartification bandwagon means these types of products could dominate the home air quality industry in the near future.

The purifying fan, which has a similar fan-less design to previous Dyson fan products, connects to your smartphone through an app and gives you live updates on your air quality. The new Dyson Link App is available for iOS and Android. Read more…

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